Crafts for Adults: Calendars!

Don’t let the kids have all the fun! Come to the book loft and make your own calendar to take home. Miss Cindy will be there with all the supplies and directions. Start thinking about homemade gifts for Christmas! Please RSVP to the bookstore at...

Book Talk with James Renner

For November’s First Friday celebration we will be hosting Ohio writer James Renner for a book talk. About the Author James Renner is mostly known for his true-crime journalism. As a reporter for Cleveland Scene, he uncovered new clues and suspects in the cold-case murder of Amy Mihaljevic. His work led to the successful closure of the Tina Harmon case in 2009. He spent months researching the Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus abductions when the girls were still missing and is haunted by the fact that he had Castro’s name in his notes. His true crime writing has been featured in the Best American Crime Reporting anthology. In 2012, Renner’s debut novel was published. Set in Northeast Ohio, The Man from Primrose Lane blends mystery with sci-fi in a very unique structure. Renner has published two books recently — a novel called The Great Forgetting (Nov 2015) and a memoir titled, True Crime Addict (May 2016). About the Books The Great Forgetting (novel): Jack Felter, a history teacher, returns home to bucolic Franklin Mills, Ohio, to care for his father. Jack would love to forget about Franklin Mills, and about Sam, the girl he fell in love with, who ran off with his best friend, Tony. Except Tony has gone missing. Soon Jack is pulled into the search for Tony, but the only one who seems to know anything is Tony’s last patient, a paranoid boy named Cole. When Jack learns the details about the program known as the Great Forgetting, he’s faced with the timeless question: Is it better to forget our greatest mistake or to remember, so...

Autobiography of Brutus Buckeye

Join us for a reading of Brutus Buckeye’s autobiography by his “mother,” Sally Lanyon. It’s normally good practice to steer clear of people who are nuts. But not in this case. The story of Ohio State University’s beloved mascot, Brutus Buckeye, is the lively and first-ever-told account of Brutus’ life, from his birth in 1965 on a sorority house lawn as a gigantic, papier-mache head, to who he is today: a less rotund and more sophisticated fabric version of his many former selves. Brutus shares the inside tales of his parents, his birth, his name, his many travels, and his kidnappings. We learn that he is so much more than a rambunctious, high kicking mascot, zipping around the sidelines at Ohio State University’s sporting events. He is a representative for fundraising as he supports a wide array of organizations such as the Columbus Children’s Hospital, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, and the Make-A-Wish Foundation. In 2007, he was elected into the Mascot Hall of...

Talk on the Reformatory with Nancy Darbey

Join us with Nancy Darbey, author of the Arcadia Publishing book on The Ohio State Reformatory. In the state of Ohio, before 1884, most first-time offenders between the ages of 16 and 30 were housed in the Ohio Penitentiary, where they were likely to be influenced by hardened criminals. That changed when the Ohio Legislature approved the building of a reformatory, a new type of institution that would educate and train young, first-time offenders. Construction was halted three times due to lack of funding, but on September 17, 1896, the first 150 inmates were transferred to the new facility. Over the years, the reformatory expanded its training programs and became a self-sustaining institution–the largest of its kind in the United States. By 1970, the reformatory had become a maximum-security prison with a death row but no death chamber. It closed on December 31, 1990, but preservation and restoration efforts are ongoing. The reformatory has appeared in numerous television shows and feature films, including The Shawshank...

Storytime!

Ms Au shares stories with the kids, Miss Cindy helps them make a craft to take home, and we ALL eat cookies!

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